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Genealogy Gems in Confederate Citizens Files

My last two posts contained self-publishing tips.  I decided to take a break and publish a research tip.  The next post will continue with the self-publishing tips.

I recently discovered information on three of my ancestors in the Confederate Citizens Files while performing research using fold3.com (formerly footnote.com).  The Confederate States of America (aka the Confederacy) was a government established by the eleven southern states that seceded from the United States during the Civil War. The Confederate Citizens Files were created during 1861-1865 and mainly consist of papers relating to civilians who were members of the Confederate States of America.  These files contains papers such as bills and vouchers from individuals for services and supplies provided to the Confederate Government and claims against the government for damages.

The document titled Perpetuating evidence of slave abduction and harboring by the enemy is of particular interest when seeking information on enslaved ancestors.  In 1861, the Congress of the Confederate States of American passed “an act to perpetuate testimony in cases of slaves abduction or harbored by the enemy, and other property seized, wasted, or destroyed by them”.  This act allowed slave owners to appear before a judge or appropriate representative and make an affidavit of the loss of their property.  Other individuals could submit oral or written evidence in support of the person’s claim. After all the evidence was collected the judge or his representative would state in his certificate of authentication whether the evidence was credible. This act was not meant to imply that the Confederate States were liable for making compensation for any of the property.

I located several documents in the Confederate Citizens File of Jefferson Flippo that provided information on three of my ancestors. My 3rd great grandparents, Sancho (aka Sanker) and Lucinda Shakespeare and their children were enslaved by Elijah Wigglesworth in Spotsylvania County, Virginia.  Elijah died in the 1840’s and the Shakespeare family was separated in 1846 when his estate was divided among his wife and children.

Division of Negroes and Money Belonging to the Estate of Elijah Wiglesworth

Division of Negroes and Money Belonging to the Estate of Elijah Wiglesworth

Three of Sancho and Lucinda’s children: Richmond, Nancy and Matilda were then enslaved by Elijah’s daughter Almira and then Jefferson Flippo of Caroline County, Virginia when Almira married him in 1854.  I have found a lot of information on Matilda both during and after slavery and have located some of her living descendants.  However, I have not found much information on Richmond and Nancy.

Lot No. 6 drawn by Almira W. Wiglesworth

Lot No. 6 drawn by Almira W. Wiglesworth

The perpetuating evidence document for Jefferson Flippo was filed on October 21, 1862.  It contained a list of individuals who were enslaved by Jefferson Flippo and secured their freedom by leaving with the Union soldiers.   As I scanned the list I noticed the names of three of my ancestors: Richmond (age 26), Nancy (age 20) and Susan (age 1).  From early research I believe that Nancy had a daughter named Susan in April 1861 while she was enslaved by Jefferson Flippo.   Based on their ages I believe Richmond, Nancy and Susan listed in this document may be my Shakespeare ancestors.

List and statement of slaves the property of Jefferson Flippo

List and statement of slaves the property of Jefferson Flippo

As I looked further through the document I found several statements by individuals that provided additional insight.  There was a sworn statement signed October 7th 1862 from Jefferson Flippo where he stated he was the legal owner of the slaves, Richmond, William, Nancy and Susan [illegible]  until about the 1st day of Jun 1862.  His statement also indicates that  Richmond and William left on or about the 1st day of Jun 1862 and Nancy and Susan left about the middle of July.

Statement of Jefferson Flippo

Statement of Jefferson Flippo

Another page of the document contains the oral evidence given by Nelson Beasley and John T. Goodwin, neighbors of Jefferson Flippo and provides further insight.  In addition to corroborating the information provided by Jefferson Flippo,  they also indicate my ancestors were last seen in Fredericksburg.   The final page in the document contains the certification of legal ownership by Philip Samuels, Justice of the Peace.

Oral Evidence from Nelson Beasly and John T. Goodman

Oral Evidence from Nelson Beasly and John T. Goodman

I now have some insight into what happened to Richmond, Nancy her daughter Susan but I still do no know what became of them.  I now have many more questions.  What surname did they use after they obtained their freedom?  Where did they go? The oral evidence states they were last seen in Fredericksburg.  Did they remain there or move to another location?    Did they ever reunite with their family? Many of my Shakespeare ancestors did reunite in Caroline County, Virginia after slavery.  However, I have not found any information to indicate Richmond and Nancy joined the rest of the family.

My great grandmother Louisa (who is Nancy’s sister) had a daughter named Susan whose age is very close to Nancy’s daughter named Susan.  Are Louisa’s daughter and Nancy’s daughter the same person or different people who happened to be born around the same time?  If they are the same person, does that mean something happened to Nancy?  If so, what happened to her?   These are all questions I must answer as I continue my quest to locate my Shakespeare ancestors.

Confederate Citizens Files are an excellent resource for researching the family history of both slave holding families and the individuals they enslaved. Unfortunately, the names of slaves are not indexed; therefore, those searching for their enslaved ancestors will have to search for the name of the slave owner and read each document to locate their ancestors.

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Sources:

Division of the Negroes and Money belonging to the Estate of Elijah Wiglesworth and Lot No 6. Drawn by Almira W. Wiglesworth.  Will Book R, 1843-1846 Part 2 Page 271 Repository:  Spotsylvania Court House, Spotsylvania, Virginia.

“Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-65,”  digital images, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 26 November 2011), record for Jefferson Flippo, Caroline County, Virginia, Papers of Jefferson Flippo for perpetuating evidence of slaves abducted and harbored by the enemy, filed October 21, 1862, National Archives Record Group 109, War Department Collection of Confederate Records.

Genealogy Envy

I often get frustrated when tracing my family history because I rarely find anything interesting.  “My family history is so boring”, I often complain to my genealogy buddy, Robyn. “Your family history is much more interesting”, I tell her.   Robyn just laughs and says, “Girl, you are so silly!!!”

Sometimes when I listen to Robyn talk about her family history, I get a slight case of genealogy envy. One of her family lines is the Holt’s from Hardin County, Tennessee. She is related to Lester Holt who is a news anchor for the weekend edition of NBC’s Today and Nightly News.  Her Holt relatives intermarried on two sides of Alex Haley’s family and she is related to his paternal grandmother, Queen. The Haley’s have been a part of her family for awhile and attend the family reunions.  Her great great grandfather, John Holt, was the largest black landowner in Hardin County, was the Postmaster, owned a store and had a school named for him (Holtsville).

The The Children of

The Children of John Holt

If that is not enough, another of her family lines is the Waters from Eastern Shore, MD. Several of them were Methodist ministers and the family had been free since 1819. Her paternal grandmother, Pauline Waters Smith, went to Bennett College and served on the Board of Trustees. Her paternal great grandmother was a Prather and was educated at the Institute for Colored Youth in Pennsylvania, a prominent school that later became Cheyney University and is the oldest historically black college and university (HBCU) in the nation.

And there is even more.  Her grandfather (Pauline’s husband) William Smith started a string of successful pharmacies in Jacksonville in the 1940s. The family was well-known and prosperous. They owned a beach house on American Beach – a popular beach for Negroes in Florida during the era of segregation – and were featured in several newspaper articles.

On top of all this she has met numerous new relatives.  And almost every new relative she meets shares a ton of pictures and information with her.  The room in her house where she does her genealogy research looks like a museum with all the photos of her ancestors!!!

Most family historians would love to have ancestors who were movers and shakers in their community.  However, for many that will not be the case.  Many of our ancestors were just ordinary people who spent their lives working hard to provide their families with the basic necessities of life.

I come from a family of ordinary folks who lived ordinary lives.  My family is very private and does not talk much about the family history. There is no oral history that was passed down through the generations.  I have a few photos of my grandparents, but nothing for the previous generations.   Most of the family history I know I obtained in bits and pieces from relatives and a lot of research.

Willie Woodfolk my paternal great grandfather's brother

Willie Woodfolk - My paternal great grandfather's brother

Susan Woolfolk Waugh

Susan Woolfolk Waugh - My paternal great grandfather's sister

I have not met anyone who is researching my direct family line.  However, I have met a few cousins who are descendants from siblings of my great grandfather, Overton Roy Woodfork.   One cousin in Philadelphia had an interest in the family history and had done research.  She shared with me a family bible, pictures and other documents that were very helpful.  We still talk occasionally.  I have met a few other new cousins who have been helpful as well.

One time I thought I had found something interesting, but it fizzled out.  I was contacted by the descendant of my ancestors slave owner (Elijah Wiggelsworth) after being featured in a news article about the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center (CRHC) in Fredericksburg, Virginia.  We scheduled a meeting.  The meeting was pleasant, but uneventful. The majority of the information the lady had on the Wiggelsworth family was after the Civil War (which was not very helpful to me) and she did not have any information on their slaves.

I plan to read Melvin Collier’s book 150 Years Later:  Broken Ties Mended in which he discusses his journey to locate descendants of his ancestors who were separated during slavery. I believe the book concludes with a discussion of how all the descendants he located got together for a family reunion 150 years after their ancestors had been separated.  How exciting!!!  Maybe one day I will be so lucky.

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